Comments
yourfanat wrote: I am using another tool for Oracle developers - dbForge Studio for Oracle. This IDE has lots of usefull features, among them: oracle designer, code competion and formatter, query builder, debugger, profiler, erxport/import, reports and many others. The latest version supports Oracle 12C. More information here.

2008 West
DIAMOND SPONSOR:
Data Direct
SOA, WOA and Cloud Computing: The New Frontier for Data Services
PLATINUM SPONSORS:
Red Hat
The Opening of Virtualization
GOLD SPONSORS:
Appsense
User Environment Management – The Third Layer of the Desktop
Cordys
Cloud Computing for Business Agility
EMC
CMIS: A Multi-Vendor Proposal for a Service-Based Content Management Interoperability Standard
Freedom OSS
Practical SOA” Max Yankelevich
Intel
Architecting an Enterprise Service Router (ESR) – A Cost-Effective Way to Scale SOA Across the Enterprise
Sensedia
Return on Assests: Bringing Visibility to your SOA Strategy
Symantec
Managing Hybrid Endpoint Environments
VMWare
Game-Changing Technology for Enterprise Clouds and Applications
Click For 2008 West
Event Webcasts

2008 West
PLATINUM SPONSORS:
Appcelerator
Get ‘Rich’ Quick: Rapid Prototyping for RIA with ZERO Server Code
Keynote Systems
Designing for and Managing Performance in the New Frontier of Rich Internet Applications
GOLD SPONSORS:
ICEsoft
How Can AJAX Improve Homeland Security?
Isomorphic
Beyond Widgets: What a RIA Platform Should Offer
Oracle
REAs: Rich Enterprise Applications
Click For 2008 Event Webcasts
SYS-CON.TV
Today's Top SOA Links


How Will Hurricane Sandy Affect the New York Housing Market?

NEW YORK, Nov. 8, 2012 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- Hurricane Sandy destroyed thousands of homes in its path, flooded countless others, and left homeowners all along the Upper East Coast wondering how much it will cost to repair their now damaged homes. Analysts at the housing research firm CoreLogic estimate the storm caused $88 billion in damages to approximately to 284,000 residential properties in the Mid-Atlantic region alone. So, how does the storm's destructive path affect the housing market in metropolitan areas like New York City or in beach communities along the Jersey shoreline?

In lots of ways! At first, the number of home sales will drop because homeowners will take their previously "For Sale" properties off the market to repair the damages caused by the storm. Also, people searching the market for a home will be more apprehensive to purchase a property if it's damaged. Pending sales could also fall apart as prospective buyers will likely ask for a new appraisal on a property before signing the paperwork. And, with fewer homes on the market, you can expect to see listing prices to increase. It's a case of simple supply and demand! Homeowners who were fortunate enough to not be affected by the storm know there's less out there to chose from, so they'll profit from the natural disaster, by raising prices due to the reduced inventory.

Economists say that because the storm had such a wide path, the effects will be felt across the region -- but no single area will be severely affected. In other words, don't expect to see a complete housing market collapse anywhere near the likes of what happened in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina back in 2005. If there is anything good that can be taken from this storm it's that it occurred right before housing construction typically slows down for the winter. It's a phenomenon called "seasonality", and simply put, fewer people build new homes or do renovations in the colder months of the year. This is especially true in the Upper East Coast, where the winter months can be bitterly cold! Also, many homes along the Jersey Shore are beach rental properties, so owners of those homes will likely not see the repairs as an immediate priority, since beach season is six months away. So, builders in the area were already prepared for a drop-off in their workloads. In four to six months -- which is the typical amount of time it takes for home insurance payments to be distributed after a storm -- expect to see the home construction business to see a boom from the storm's victims. By then, it will be warm again, and homeowners with insurance checks will decide to either repair the damages caused by the storm, or completely rebuild a new home. What about foreclosures? As for foreclosures, many things could happen! Many lenders have already announced they are willing to work with homeowners affected by the storm, and they will accept late payments instead of foreclosing on a property. Obviously, this is a case-by-case scenario, so if you were affected by Hurricane Sandy, it's best to talk directly with a representative from the financial institution who handles your mortgage. Economists also speculate that many homeowners who were behind on mortgage payments and were close to foreclosure before the storm are more likely to walk away from a damaged property and accept foreclosure instead of a short sale or other quick fix options. New York and New Jersey were among the slowest states in judicial foreclosure processes in the country prior to the storm, and this destruction and devastation could slow that process down even more in those states in the months to come.

Media Contact: Daniel Torelli RealtyPin.com, 514-836-1432, daniel@realtypin.com

News distributed by PR Newswire iReach: https://ireach.prnewswire.com

SOURCE RealtyPin.com

About PR Newswire
Copyright © 2007 PR Newswire. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PRNewswire content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of PRNewswire. PRNewswire shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.

Web 2.0 Latest News
Despite the data privacy protections supposedly conferred by regulations like HIPAA and HITECH, consumers’ confidential health and personal information is still not safe enough. That’s the lesson to be learned from Franklin, TN-based Community Health Systems’ (CHS) August 18 regulatory...
Putting on a rock show is like piloting the Millenium Falcon – it’s simultaneously the fastest ship in the galaxy while being a “piece of junk.” The stage lights are so hot you start to sweat immediately, hoping those Jager-bombs are escaping through your pores and delaying the impend...
The IT infrastructure of modern businesses require a number of seemingly never-ending cycles to track assets. As these assets go through different stages of usefulness or functionality, IT teams must constantly manage the process, which takes them away from other more important tasks a...
The Open Group and BriefingsDirect recently assembled a distinguished panel at The Open Group Boston Conference 2014 to explore the practical implications and limits of the Internet of Things. This so-called Internet of Things means more data, more cloud connectivity and management, a...
General Electric (GE) has been a household name for more than a century, thanks in large part to its role in making households easier to run. Starting with the light bulb invented by its founder, Thomas Edison, GE has been selling devices (“things”) to consumers throughout its 122-year...
Subscribe to the World's Most Powerful Newsletters
Subscribe to Our Rss Feeds & Get Your SYS-CON News Live!
Click to Add our RSS Feeds to the Service of Your Choice:
Google Reader or Homepage Add to My Yahoo! Subscribe with Bloglines Subscribe in NewsGator Online
myFeedster Add to My AOL Subscribe in Rojo Add 'Hugg' to Newsburst from CNET News.com Kinja Digest View Additional SYS-CON Feeds
Publish Your Article! Please send it to editorial(at)sys-con.com!

Advertise on this site! Contact advertising(at)sys-con.com! 201 802-3021




SYS-CON Featured Whitepapers
ADS BY GOOGLE